TALLERES DE INCAPACIDAD MÉDICA

ELIGE UNO DE LOS TALLERES SIGUIENTES PARA PRESENTARLO Y QUE TE MEJORES

TALLER # 1

Nombre del alumno________________________________________
Grado _______________  #  __________ Fecha ________________________
Profesora ________________________________________________________

ACTIVIDADES

1. Traducir y responder las preguntas
2. Presentar el trabajo con las normas icontec (En hojas de block)
3. Investigar otra lectura en inglés, no es necesario que la traduzcas

THOMAS ALVA EDISON

Thomas Alva Edison lit up the world with his invention of the electric light. Without him, the world might still be a dark place. However, the electric light was not his only invention. He also invented the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and over 1,200 other things. About every two weeks he created something new.
Thomas A. Edison was born in Milan, Ohio, on February 11, 1847. His family moved to Port Huron, Michigan, when he was seven years old. Surprisingly, he attended school for only two months. His mother, a former teacher, taught him a few things, but Thomas was mostly self-educated. His natural curiosity led him to start experimenting at a young age with electrical and mechanical things at home.
When he was 12 years old, he got his first job. He became a newsboy on a train that ran between Port Huron and Detroit. He set up a laboratory in a baggage care of the train so that he could continue his experiments in his spare time. Unfortunately, his first work experience did not end well. Thomas was fired when he accidentally set fire to the floor of the baggage car.
Thomas then worked for five years as a telegraph operator, but he continued to spend much of his time on the job conducting experiments. He got his first patent in 1868 for a vote recorder run by electricity. However, the vote recorder was not a success. In 1870, he sold another invention, a stock-ticker, for $40,000. A stock-ticker is a machine that automatically prints stock prices on a tape. He was then able to build his first shop in Newark, New Jersey.
Thomas Edison was totally deaf in one ear and hard of hearing in the other, but thought of his deafness as a blessing in many ways. It kept conversations short, so that he could have more time for work. He called himself a "two-shift man" because he worked 16 out of every 24 hours. Sometimes he worked so intensely that his wife had to remind him to sleep and eat.
Thomas Edison died at the age of 84 on October 18, 1931, at his estate in West Orange, New Jersey. He left numerous inventions that improved the quality of life all over the world.

1. Thomas Edison did things in this order:

A      he became a telegraph operator, a newsboy, and then got his first patent
B      he became a newsboy, got his first patent, and then became a telegraph operator
C      he got a patent, became a telegraph operator, and then became a newsboy
D      he became a newsboy, a telegraph operator, and then got a patent

2. Edison considered his deafness:

A      a disadvantage
B      a blessing
C      something from a priest
D      a necessity

3. Of all the inventions, __________ was probably the most important for civilization.

A      the vote recorder
B      the stock ticker
C      the light bulb
D      the motion picture camera


4. The main idea of this passage is:

A      Thomas Edison was always interested in science and inventions, and he invented many important things.
B      Thomas Edison could not keep a job.
C      Thomas Edison worked day and night on his experiments.
D      Deaf people make good inventors because they can focus without the distraction of spoken conversation.


5. What think about the reading?


TALLER # 2

Nombre del alumno___________________________________________
Grado ___________  #  _________________ Fecha ____________________
Profesora ________________________________________________________

 ACTIVIDADES

1. Traducir y responder las preguntas
2. Presentar el trabajo con las normas icontec (En hojas de block)
3. Investigar otra lectura en inglés, no es necesario que la traduzcas

World Cup

The FIFA World Cup (often called the Football World Cup, Soccer World Cup or simply the World Cup) is the most important men's competition in international football. The world's most representative team sport event, the World Cup is contested by the men's national football teams of Federation International de Football Association (FIFA) (the sport's largest governing body) member nations. The championship has been awarded every four years since the first tournament in 1930 (except in 1942 and 1946 due to World War II). However, it is more of an ongoing event as the qualifying rounds of the competition take place over the three years preceding the final rounds. In 1991, FIFA added a separate Women's World Cup.

The men's final tournament phase (often called the "Finals") involves 32 national teams competing over a four-week period in a previously nominated host nation, with these games making it the most widely-viewed sporting event in the world. In the 17 tournaments held, only seven nations have ever won the World Cup Finals. Brazil is the current holder, as well as the most successful World Cup team, having won the tournament five times, while Germany and Italy follow with three titles each. The next football World Cup Finals will be held in Germany between June 9 and July 9, 2006.



Questions
Now, answer the questions about the text.

1. The tournament takes place every four years.

True.
False.
We don't know.

2. In 1942 the World Cup was not played.
True.
False.
We don't know.

3. There are 32 teams playing the World Cup.

True.
False.
We don't know.

4. Only seven nations have ever won the championship.

True.
False.
We don't know.


 TALLER # 3

Nombre del alumno_____________________________________________
Grado ____________  #  _________________ Fecha ____________________
Profesora ______________________________________________________

ACTIVIDADES

1. Traducir y responder las preguntas
2. Presentar el trabajo con las normas icontec (En hojas de block)
3. Investigar otra lectura en inglés, no es necesario que la traduzcas

Robinson Crusoe

I was born in the year 1632, in the city of York, of a good family, though not of that country, my father being a foreigner of Bremen, who settled first at Hull. He got a good estate by merchandise, and leaving off his trade, lived afterwards at York, from whence he had married my mother, whose relations were named Robinson, a very good family in that country, and from whom I was called Robinson Kreutznaer; but, by the usual corruption of words in England, we are now called - nay we call ourselves and write our name - Crusoe; and so my companions always called me.
I had two elder brothers, one of whom was lieutenant-colonel to an English regiment of foot in Flanders, formerly commanded by the famous Colonel Lockhart, and was killed at the battle near Dunkirk against the Spaniards. What became of my second brother I never knew, any more than my father or mother knew what became of me.
Being the third son of the family and not bred to any trade, my head began to be filled very early with rambling thoughts. My father, who was very ancient, had given me a competent share of learning, as far as house-education and a country free school generally go, and designed me for the law; but I would be satisfied with nothing but going to sea; and my inclination to this led me so strongly against the will, nay, the commands of my father, and  against all the entreaties and persuasions of my mother and other friends, that there seemed to be something fatal in that propensity of nature, tending directly to the life of misery which was to befall me.
My father, a wise and grave man, gave me serious and excellent counsel against what he foresaw was my design. He called me one morning into his chamber, where he was confined by the gout, and expostulated very warmly with me upon this subject. He asked me what reasons, more than a mere wandering inclination, I had for leaving father's house and my native country, where I might be well introduced, and had a prospect of raising my fortune by application and industry, with a life of ease and pleasure. He told me it was men of desperate fortunes on one hand, or of aspiring, superior fortunes on the other, who went abroad upon adventures, to rise by enterprise, and make themselves famous in undertakings of a nature out of the common road; that these things were all either too far above me or too far below me; that mine was the middle state, or what might be called the upper station of low life, which he had found, by long experience, was the best state in the world, the most suited to human happiness, not exposed to the miseries and hardships, the labor and sufferings of the mechanic part of mankind, and not embarrassed with the pride, luxury, ambition, and envy of the upper part of mankind. He told me I might judge of the happiness of this state by this one thing - viz. that this was the state of life which all other people envied; that kings have frequently lamented the miserable consequence of being born to great things, and wished they had been placed in the middle of the two extremes, between the mean and the great; that the wise man gave his testimony to this, as the standard of felicity, when he prayed to have neither poverty nor riches

1. Robinson Crusoe got his name from a mixture of…
2. Robinson Crusoe had two brothers who…
3. When Crusoe's father learned that he wanted to travel and see the world he…
4. Crusoe’s father thought that it was better to…
5. Robinson Crusoe’s father…
6. What think about the reading?

CONSULTA   -   TALLER # 1

Nombre del alumno___________________________________________________________
Grado ____________________  #  _________________ Fecha ________________________
Profesora ___________________________________________________________________

ACTIVIDADES

1. Traducir y responder las preguntas
2. Presentar el trabajo con las normas icontec (como se te dijo en clase)
3. Investigar otra lectura en inglés, no es necesario que la traduzcas


Alice in Wonderland

Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, 'and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice 'without pictures or conversation?'
So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.
There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, 'Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!' (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.
In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.
The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.
Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything; then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and book-shelves; here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed; it was labelled 'ORANGE MARMALADE', but to her great disappointment it was empty: she did not like to drop the jar for fear of killing somebody, so managed to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.

1. What does ‘peeped into the book’ in the first paragraph mean?
2. What did Alice think was strange about the rabbit when it ran by her? 
3. How did Alice get into the well?
4. The cupboards and bookshelves were…
5. When Alice discovered that the jar of marmalade was empty she
6. What think about the reading?


CONSULTA   -   TALLER # 1

Nombre del alumno___________________________________________________________
Grado ____________________  #  _________________ Fecha ________________________
Profesora ___________________________________________________________________

ACTIVIDADES

1. Traducir y responder las preguntas
2. Presentar el trabajo con las normas icontec (como se te dijo en clase)
3. Investigar otra lectura en inglés, no es necesario que la traduzcas

The prince and the pauper

Tom was conducted to the principal apartment of a noble suite, and made to sit down--a thing which he was lath to do, since there were elderly men and men of high degree about him. He begged them to be seated also, but they only bowed their thanks or murmured them, and remained standing. He would have insisted, but his 'uncle' the Earl of Hertford whispered in his ear--
"Prithee, insist not, my lord; it is not meet that they sit in thy presence."
The Lord St. John was announced, and after making obeisance to Tom, he said--
"I come upon the King's errand, concerning a matter which requireth privacy. Will it please your royal highness to dismiss all that attend you here, save my lord the Earl of Hertford?"
Observing that Tom did not seem to know how to proceed, Hertford whispered him to make a sign with his hand, and not trouble himself to speak unless he chose. When the waiting gentlemen had retired, Lord St. John said--
"His majesty commanded, that for due and weighty reasons of state, the prince's grace shall hide his infirmity in all ways that be within his power, till it be passed and he be as he was before. To wit, that he shall deny to none that he is the true prince, and heir to England's greatness; that he shall uphold his princely dignity, and shall receive, without word or sign of protest, that reverence and observance which unto it do appertain of right and ancient usage; that he shall cease to speak to any of that lowly birth and life his malady hath conjured out of the unwholesome imaginings of o'er-wrought fancy; that he shall strive with diligence to bring unto his memory again those faces which he was wont to know--and where he failed he shall hold his peace, neither betraying by semblance of surprise or other sign that he hath forgot; that upon occasions of state, whensoever any matter shall perplex him as to the thing he should do or the utterance he should make, he shall show naught of unrest to the curious that look on, but take advice in that matter of the Lord Hertford, or my humble self, which are commanded of the King to be upon this service and close at call, till this commandment be dissolved. Thus saith the King's majesty, who sanded greeting to your royal highness, and prayeth that God will of His mercy quickly heal you and have you now and ever in His holy keeping."
The Lord St. John made reverence and stood aside. Tom replied resignedly--
"The King hath said it. None may palter with the King's command, or fit it to his ease, where it doth chafe, with deft evasions. The King shall be obeyed."
Lord Hertford said--
"Touching the King's majesty's ordainment concerning books and such like serious matters, it may peradventure please your highness to ease your time with lightsome entertainment, lest you go wearied to the banquet and suffer harm thereby."
Tom's face showed inquiring surprise; and a blush followed when he saw Lord St. John's eyes bent sorrowfully upon him. His lordship said--
"Thy memory still wronged thee, and thou hast shown surprise--but suffer it not to trouble thee, for 'tis a matter that will not bide, but depart with thy mending malady. My Lord of Hertford spoke of the city's banquet which the King's majesty did promise, some two months flown, your highness should attend. They recollect it now?"
"It grieves me to confess it had indeed escaped me," said Tom, in a hesitating voice; and blushed again.


1. The men in the apartment didn’t sit down because…
2. When the Lord St. John came in the room, he wanted to speak to…
3. Tom is actually…
4. How do you think Tom is feeling?
5. Tom blushed and felt embarrassed because…
6. What think about the reading?

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